15 “Custom” & Best Storage For Ryzen 5 5600x, 5800X, And 5900X

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As a gamer, I know how difficult it can be to build a gaming PC around a CPU. Finally, I’ve created the list of fifinest gaming PC configuration with the 5600X CPU.

Name Where To Buy
  • Corsair Force Series MP600 1TB Gen4 PCIe X4 NVMe M.2 SSD, Up to 4,950 MB/s (CSSD-F1000GBMP600)
  • Sabrent 1TB Rocket NVMe 4.0 Gen4 PCIe M.2 Internal SSD Extreme Performance Solid State Drive (SB-ROCKET-NVMe4-1TB)
  • WD_BLACK 1TB SN750 NVMe Internal Gaming SSD Solid State Drive – Gen3 PCIe, M.2 2280, 3D NAND, Up to 3,470 MB/s – WDS100T3X0C
  • SAMSUNG 980 PRO 500GB PCIe NVMe Gen4 Internal Gaming SSD M.2 (MZ-V8P500B)
  • addlink 1TB S70 NVMe PCIe M.2 2280 SSD GEN 3×4 3D TLC NAND R/W up to 3,400/3,000 MB/s Internal Solid State Drive
  • WD_BLACK 500GB SN850 NVMe Internal Gaming SSD Solid State Drive – Gen4 PCIe, M.2 2280, 3D NAND, Up to 7,000 MB/s – WDS500G1X0E
  • SAMSUNG 980 SSD 1TB M.2 NVMe Interface Internal Solid State Drive with V-NAND Technology for Gaming, Heavy Graphics, Full Power Mode, MZ-V8V1T0B/AM
  • SAMSUNG 970 EVO Plus SSD 1TB, M.2 NVMe Interface Internal Solid State Hard Drive with V-NAND Technology for Gaming, Graphic Design, MZ-V7S1T0B/AM
  • WD_BLACK 500GB SN750 NVMe Internal Gaming SSD Solid State Drive – Gen3 PCIe, M.2 2280, 3D NAND, Up to 3,430 MB/s – WDS500G3X0C
  • Intel 660p Series M.2 2280 1TB PCIe NVMe 3.0 x4 3D2, QLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) SSDPEKNW010T8X1

ALSO SEE: Best Motherboard for Ryzen 5 5600X and RTX 3060 Ti

Best Storage For Ryzen 5 5600x

  • Corsair Force Series MP600 1TB Gen4 PCIe X4 NVMe M.2 SSD, Up to 4,950 MB/s (CSSD-F1000GBMP600)

As of the time I acquired this (I was one of the lucky ones that pre-ordered before the page was gone), the top-end PCIe Gen 3 drives were perfectly price matched with this drive.

As a result, Corsair’s decision to offer PCIe Gen 4 speeds at no additional cost was a thoughtful gesture.

I’m using an MSI X570 Ace motherboard with two of them in RAID 0. It is then partitioned into two separate 2 TB RAID 0 drives. 450GB for the operating system (Windows 10 64bit Home), and the rest of the space is devoted to a single volume on which I store the hardware that requires PCIe Gen 4 access.

It’s impossible to keep up with the speeds of the drives. These drives can only operate at their top rates when connected via PCIe Gen 4.

In reality, the performance gain from using the disks in RAID 0 as standalone, non-RAID SSDs is more than 90 percent of what you’d receive from using the MSI X570 Ace in its current state of poor RAID 0 implementation. If you’re using a different motherboard, your results will be different here.

Heatsinks on the drives keep them cool. Because many motherboards already provide active cooling solutions for m.2 drives, Corsair should have left the heatsinks attached to the motherboards, according to my opinion.

It is entirely up to the individual user to decide whether or not to utilize the heatsink.

I have nothing but praise for this product, save for one minor gripe. These hard disks are affordable, fast, and quiet. Corsair nailed it with this one.

  • Sabrent 1TB Rocket NVMe 4.0 Gen4 PCIe M.2 Internal SSD Extreme Performance Solid State Drive (SB-ROCKET-NVMe4-1TB)

When I purchased this, it was $50-60 less expensive than the Aorus or Corsair Gen4 SSDs that utilize the identical Phison PS5016-E16 controller and Toshiba’s BiCS4 96-layer TLC (triple-level cell) NAND. This is a very great device.”

Sabrent also provides a five-year warranty on their products (you have to register it). Because I’ll be using it with a board that already has an NVMe socket heatsink, I opted for the version without one.

If you buy this drive and don’t have an x570 motherboard (the only chipset currently supporting PCIe gen4), you can still use it on a gen3 board and get somewhat higher performance than a current gen 3 drive. The drive delivers as claimed on the box speeds for both Gen4 and Gen3.

The same was true for me. The foam-filled tin was well-protected and stylish, which was not what I was anticipating from the packing.

At the very least, I’ll be picking up another drive, most likely the 2TB, in the near future. A Samsung NVMe aficionado to boot.

  • WD_BLACK 1TB SN750 NVMe Internal Gaming SSD Solid State Drive – Gen3 PCIe, M.2 2280, 3D NAND, Up to 3,470 MB/s – WDS100T3X0C

This SN750 NVMe drive was purchased to replace a Crucial SSD for my operating system. This one is noticeably faster. Although the process of cloning my OS to this drive was quite straightforward, I had several difficulties.

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I ended up reinstalling Windows after I backed up my important files. I didn’t have to buy a new operating system because my computer’s motherboard or CPU remained the same. That being said, the rest of the trip has gone off without a hitch.

PROS:

Speedy: The box claims sequential read/write speeds of up to 3400MB/s. However, I’ve found mine to be roughly 2900MB/s without any cache upgrades. Still a lot of work to be done. Using 4GB of RAM caching, I was able to read and write at a rate of roughly 8000MB/s.

Temperatures are stable: I’m using the m.2 heatsink that came with my motherboard for this. Right next to the graphics card is a m.2 slot for the NVMe primary slot on my motherboard. As a result, when that begins to generate any heat, this will also begin to heat up.

Even so, the temperature is still within acceptable limits. It measured an average of 41C, with a maximum temperature of 44C, after I ran my benchmarks on the drive. The drive’s maximum temperature after a gaming session was 55C, however it usually stays below 48C.

Price: The prices for 3D NAND drives have been going down, and they’re likely to keep going down. A 500GB drive cost around $250 a year ago at this time. I paid $120 for this one. There’s a good chance more will fall from there. This is all wonderful news for consumers. My only gripe is that the cloning software and my operating system had some issues with the drive, which were not directly connected to this drive.

In conclusion, I’d say that this drive is on par with the Samsung 970 Plus in terms of performance. In terms of cost, they’re both approximately the same. When it comes to price and performance, it is hard to go wrong with either of these drives.

There are notable differences between the SN750 and a solid-state drive (SSD). As far as I’m aware, there have never been any drive failures with WD products in my hands. Anyone looking to buy this should do so with my recommendation.

  • SAMSUNG 980 PRO 500GB PCIe NVMe Gen4 Internal Gaming SSD M.2 (MZ-V8P500B)

Everything except for large amounts of data can be transferred at close to 7.9 GB/s speeds, while massive transfers are slower, and this will greatly reduce the amount of time it takes to load resources from storage in most or all applications. There isn’t much more to say about this new generational SSD technology.

Heatsink or heatspreader is recommended for this drive, however for most usage scenarios (especially gamers) you won’t reach the point at which it throttles due to temperature. A solid-state drive (SSD) is essentially the same as a traditional hard disk drive (HDD).

  • addlink 1TB S70 NVMe PCIe M.2 2280 SSD GEN 3×4 3D TLC NAND R/W up to 3,400/3,000 MB/s Internal Solid State Drive

An NVMe drive with 3400/2000MB/s read and write speeds for $90 seemed like a fantastic deal to me, even if this brand was unfamiliar to me. Because of all the great reviews, I decided to take a risk. It was a wise move.

It was a breeze to install, but be aware that it does not include a m2 screw. A built-in heatsink was included with my motherboard (ASRock master sli x470). Choose the quickest m2 slot on your motherboard if it’s available (there can be differences).

I was given the option of two m2 slots (the first of which I chose, because it was the appropriate choice):

PCIe Gen3 x4 and SATA3 Ultra M.2 interfaces (PCIe Gen2 x2 & SATA3)

The Windows installation process was lengthy, but once it was complete, everything worked well. Previously, I was using an Adata SU650 with 480GB of storage. However, this is substantially faster than the previous model.

A few seconds after my motherboard publishes, the Windows logo flashes on the screen. Instantly downloadable applications are available. Every part of it seems to be moving at breakneck speed. This is the kind of high-quality m2 drive I should have purchased a long time ago!

After installing Windows, I ran the CrystalMark benchmarks. Reads 3468 MB/sec, and writes 2280 MB/sec The promised speeds are considerably more impressive than this (by a little).

The weather is perfect right now. HWInfo64 shows the current temperatures after a fresh reboot:

Temperature range: 14°C at the low end to 31°C at the high end

Most of the time, it’s 22c.

In certain regions, I noted that the temperature fluctuated a lot (i.e., it will go to 14c, then bounce up to 26c, then back down to 14c, etc.). But the maximum temperature has always been in the 30s, even with heavy use.

It has exceeded my expectations in every way. The only way I’ll buy from this firm again in the future is if this drive lasts.

Best Storage For Ryzen 5 5600x

  • WD_BLACK 500GB SN850 NVMe Internal Gaming SSD Solid State Drive – Gen4 PCIe, M.2 2280, 3D NAND, Up to 7,000 MB/s – WDS500G1X0E

Even with WD’s own migration/cloning tools, the 2TB NVME drive I purchased to serve as my primary OS will not migrate or clone successfully. A 3rd-party migration/cloning software I downloaded also didn’t work. ‘

Over the course of 1.5 days, I gave practically everything a shot! I even tried manually backing up and restoring before attempting to fix the problem. Everything failed.

Nothing good came of it. The only thing I took away from this experience is that you should only work with companies that provide a ready-to-use, comprehensive solution and don’t spend your valuable time in the process. Another 1.5 days of wasted time.

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Ultimately, I upgraded from a Samsung 1TB NVME to a Samsung 2TB NVME, and the process couldn’t have been simpler or more straightforward. 15 minutes, that’s a lot of time! Previously, when I couldn’t migrate from a Corsair SSD to Samsung 1tb NVME, that migration was also immaculate. My initial choice of Samsung 2TB instead of WD’s 1TB was a mistake. It was covered by the media in a favourable way. Because I am not a diehard fan, I am always open to new ideas.

That was an error of judgment. After this experience, it’s clear to me that Samsung does a better job than anyone else at giving the greatest hardware and software in one package. There are no flaws in the experience. No problems have occurred with any of their storage options to date.

The purpose of this review is unclear to me. Because I squandered a good 1.5 days of my life on this. It has to lead somewhere. Because the hardware appears to be excellent, I hope it helps someone or that WD gets its act together and improves their cloning/migration software.

  • SAMSUNG 980 SSD 1TB M.2 NVMe Interface Internal Solid State Drive with V-NAND Technology for Gaming, Heavy Graphics, Full Power Mode, MZ-V8V1T0B/AM

This is a great NVMe drive for the price, but it was not evident upfront how many shortcuts were struck to achieve this favorable price/performance ratio.

The short answer is that this drive does not have a dedicated dram chip, which is used for buffering command queues, so in the case where a drive is being asked to pull a bunch of small files all at once or write a bunch of small files all at once, the dram helps to queue up these commands and ensure that things get done in the most efficient of manners.

Samsung has pulled a rabbit out of a hat here and built a system that works pretty darn well while consuming system memory, despite the fact that this drive lacks that dedicated dram.

Because of this, this drive may not perform well in systems with very low amounts of RAM, but in the vast majority of cases (8-16 GB of system memory), you can anticipate it to match or even outperform a 970 Evo NVMe in terms of performance (see picture for benchmark results, the generally slower of the two being my 970 Evo, and the 980 the other).

The fact is this drive will work perfectly for most people as their primary operating system, even if it doesn’t provide optimal speed, but it’s perfect for storing video/games/music/photos on your home computer as an extra secondary drive, even if it’s not your primary OS drive.

A 970 Evo (or even better) or another drive with dedicated dram would still be my recommendation for primary storage, but if you’re on a tight budget or only need a secondary NVMe drive, this one should fit the bill.

  • SAMSUNG 970 EVO Plus SSD 1TB, M.2 NVMe Interface Internal Solid State Hard Drive with V-NAND Technology for Gaming, Graphic Design, MZ-V7S1T0B/AM.

Wow! Is the only word that comes to mind. With this one, I’m pleased I returned my ADATA XPG SX8200 PRO 500GB. No two PCIe NVME drives are alike; they’re all intended to demonstrate the “greatest” performance on a synthetic benchmark—which can be quite different from how they actually function.

It is difficult to locate information on the slower performance of the 512GB and 256GB drives on the XPG SX8200 Pro website (which should be an important hint about performance because they don’t readily publish or display the smaller drive stats on the main page).

Second, the cyrstal diskmark benchmarks were close, but when I really tested 9GB file transfers to and from the XPG, it was often below 600MB/s (even as low as 150MB/s continuously).

If I didn’t get a dud or the specs aren’t as good as they say in real life performance, I’d say it did better at times, but it was inconsistent and nowhere near the benchmarks on a regular basis.

Even though the new Samsung EVO PLUS 970 was $30 more expensive, the actual performance of this device well outweighed the price difference.

While the Samsung EVO PLUS 970 exceeded the specifications of the CrystalDisk Mark bench, real-world file copy speeds (with a same file) consistently hovered around 2000MB/s when I inserted it into a slot formerly occupied by the ADATA.

Not as quick as the benchmark, but significantly better than the ADATA and other PCIE NVME disks I’ve had the opportunity to test Furthermore, the transfer rates remained stable throughout the file copy, in contrast to most other drives, which fluctuated.

I’m aware that even big file transfers will slow down when the cache runs out, but that’s the same for all PCIe NVME drives that use TLC technology (or anything other than MLC flash).

The benchmark read/write speeds of Samsung’s drives when using TurboBoost and the cache are disclosed up front; the company also discloses what the drive’s performance will be like when the cache runs out. That’s a sign of trust in Samsung’s SSDs that no other manufacturer is displaying.

The performance of this drive left me speechless, so much so that I decided to purchase a second one immediately. The WD N750 may be the closest “comparable” drive in terms of performance, but it’s still nowhere near this disk in terms of REAL-WORLD performance for file copying.

To see if a less expensive PCIe NVME drive is actually as good as it claims to be based on superficial benchmark tests, I’d recommend making your own huge file copies first.

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If you don’t want to risk letdown, grab the Samsung EVO PLUS and you’ll be glad you did.

  • WD_BLACK 500GB SN750 NVMe Internal Gaming SSD Solid State Drive – Gen3 PCIe, M.2 2280, 3D NAND, Up to 3,430 MB/s – WDS500G3X0C

This SN750 NVMe drive was purchased to replace a Crucial SSD for my operating system. This one is noticeably faster. Although the process of cloning my OS to this drive was quite straightforward, I had several difficulties.

I ended up reinstalling Windows after I backed up my important files. I didn’t have to buy a new operating system because my computer’s motherboard or CPU remained the same. That being said, the rest of the trip has gone off without a hitch.

PROS:

It’s a quick trip: The box claims sequential read/write speeds of up to 3400MB/s. However, I’ve found mine to be roughly 2900MB/s without any cache upgrades. Still a lot of work to be done.

Using 4GB of RAM caching, I was able to read and write at a rate of roughly 8000MB/s. The accompanying benchmark images show the results of both no-enhancement and enhanced runs. My Crucial SSD where the OS used to be averages 800MB/s without caching.

Temperatures are holding steady. I’m using the m.2 heatsink that came with my motherboard for this. Right next to the graphics card is a m.2 slot for the NVMe primary slot on my motherboard.

As a result, when that begins to generate any heat, this will also begin to heat up. Even so, the temperature is still within acceptable limits. It measured an average of 41C, with a maximum temperature of 44C, after I ran my benchmarks on the drive. The drive’s maximum temperature after a gaming session was 55C, however it usually stays below 48C.

Price: The cost of 3D NAND SSDs has been decreasing, and this trend is expected to continue. A 500GB drive cost around $250 a year ago at this time. I paid $120 for this one. There’s a good chance more will fall from there. For us consumers, this is all wonderful news.

THE CONS: My only complaint is the difficulties I had cloning the drive, most of which have nothing to do with the drive itself, but rather with the cloning program and the operating system that I was using at the time. CONS:

In conclusion, I’d say that this drive is on par with the Samsung 970 Plus in terms of performance. In terms of cost, they’re both approximately the same. When it comes to price and performance, it is hard to go wrong with either of these drives.

There are notable differences between the SN750 and a solid-state drive (SSD). As far as I’m aware, there have never been any drive failures with WD products in my hands. Anyone looking to buy this should do so with my recommendation.

  • Intel 660p Series M.2 2280 1TB PCIe NVMe 3.0 x4 3D2, QLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) SSDPEKNW010T8X1

Although I had some reservations about this SSD at first, I’ve come to realize that they are very inconsequential to my day-to-day tasks.

Using QLC flash, which has a low write endurance, was my primary worry with this drive. Even though 200 TB TBW for a 1TB disk is a little number, I had to wonder if I’d ever hit that mark in the first place.

For the past two years, I’ve been using a Crucial MX300 with a 220TB endurance rating, and I’ve barely used 2% of that capacity. Even if you write 100+GB each day for five years, it’s highly unlikely that you’ll come near to that limit in terms of volume.

This drive is amazing for the price I paid once I understood my reservations about QLC were unfounded. Any other 1TB NVMe drive will cost anywhere from 2-4 times as much as this one, and it won’t offer nearly as much in the way of features, performance, or storage.

Because this drive is already so fast, I didn’t see the need to pay more for more write endurance or even slightly faster read and write speeds, both of which are available for a nominal fee from TLC or even MLC flash.

If you have a normal workload and are looking for a big increase in speed and capacity without spending a lot of money, this drive is for you.

What memory is best for Ryzen 5 5600X?

G.Skill Trident Z Royal Series is the best for Ryzen 5 5600X.

Is Ryzen 5 5600X compatible with GB?

Despite its 6 cores and 12 threads, the AMD Ryzen 5 5600X is only compatible with A520, B550, and X570 motherboards.

Is Ryzen 5 5600X good enough for gaming?

The Ryzen 5 5600x is a top-of-the-line six-core processor, and it performs admirably at 1440p. When playing at 1440p, this processor should be paired with a powerful GPU and the clock increased to 4.6 GHz in order to get the best results.

How can I boost my Ryzen 5 5600X?

It has a base frequency of 3.7 GHz, but can reach up to 4.6 GHz when overclocked. Only 1-2 cores have access to Boost. All cores can be programmed to operate at the same speed at all times. This will improve your overall performance, especially in multi-core environments.

Is the Ryzen 5 5600X Overclockable?

It has a base frequency of 3.7 GHz, but can reach up to 4.6 GHz when overclocked. Only 1-2 cores have access to Boost. All cores can be programmed to operate at the same speed at all times. This will improve your performance, particularly for multi-core workloads.

Does 5600X automatically overclock?

Using AMD’s Ryzen Master Utility program or your motherboard’s BIOS, you can easily overclock your processor. The AMD website offers a free download of this software, which includes all the tools you need to monitor and control your CPU’s performance.

Author: Howard S. Baldwin

My name is Howard S. Baldwin. I am a work-at-home dad to three lovely girls, Jane + Hannah + Beauty. I have been blogging for the last 3 years. I worked for other Home and Lifetsyle blogs, did hundreds of product reviews and buyers’ guides. Prior to that, I was a staff accountant at a big accounting firm. Needless to say, researching and numbers are my passion. My goal is to be an informative source for any topic that relates to DIY life and homemaking.

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