10 CHEAP & Best Motherboard for Ryzen 5 5600X and RTX 3060 Ti

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The AMD Ryzen 5 5600x has six cores and twelve threads, making it one of AMD’s top mid-range CPUs. Because it’s compatible with Windows 10/11 64-bit, you can expect top-notch performance in even the most demanding games.

A more powerful graphics card, the GeForce RTX 3060 Ti, has 8 GB of GDDR6 GDDR6 memory, which is more than enough for seamless gaming. Overclocking-wise, this CPU is an excellent choice for RTX 3060 Ti, but you’ll need an extremely compatible motherboard for the best results.

Name Where To Buy
  • ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Dark Hero AMD AM4 X570S Zen 3 Ryzen 5000 & 3rd Gen Ryzen ATX Gaming Motherboard (PCIe 4.0, 14+2 Ti Power Stages, PCH Heatsink, Wi-Fi 6, 2.5 Gbps LAN, USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C
  • MSI MPG B550I Gaming Edge WiFi Gaming Motherboard (AMD AM4, DDR4, PCIe 4.0, SATA 6Gb/s, M.2, USB 3.2 Gen 2, AX Wi-Fi 6, HDMI, Mini-ITX)
  • ASUS ROG Strix X570-E Gaming ATX Motherboard- PCIe 4.0, Aura Sync RGB Lighting, 2.5 Gbps and Intel Gigabit LAN, WIFI 6 (802.11Ax), Dual M.2 Heatsinks
  • MSI Meg X570 Unify Motherboard (AMD AM4, DDR4, PCIe 4.0, SATA 6GB/s, M.2, USB 3.2 Gen 2, Ax Wi-Fi 6, Bluetooth 5, ATX)
  • ASUS ROG X570 Crosshair VIII Hero (Wi-Fi) ATX Motherboard with PCIe 4.0, on-Board WiFi 6 (802.11Ax), 2.5 Gbps LAN, USB 3.2, SATA, M.2, Node and Aura Sync RGB Lighting
  • ASUS ROG Strix X570-I Gaming, X570 Mini-ITX Gaming Motherboard, AMD Ryzen 3000 with PCIe 4.0, WiFi 6 (802.11ax), Intel Gigabit Ethernet, SATA 6Gb/s
  • ASUS Prime X570-Pro AM4 Zen 3 Ryzen 5000 & 3rd Gen Ryzen ATX Motherboard with PCIe Gen4, Dual M.2 HDMI, SATA 6GB/s USB 3.2 Gen 2 ATX Motherboard
  • ASUS AM4 TUF Gaming X570-Plus (Wi-Fi) AM4 Zen 3 Ryzen 5000 & 3rd Gen Ryzen ATX Motherboard with PCIe 4.0, Dual M.2, 12+2 with Dr. MOS Power Stage
  • Gigabyte X570 AORUS Elite (AMD Ryzen 3000/X570/ATX/PCIe4.0/DDR4/USB3.1/Realtek ALC1200/Front USB Type-C/RGB Fusion 2.0/M.2 Thermal Guard/Gaming Motherboard)
  • MSI MPG X570 GAMING EDGE WIFI Motherboard (AMD AM4, DDR4, PCIe 4.0, SATA 6Gb/s, M.2, USB 3.2 Gen 2, AC Wi-Fi 5, HDMI, ATX)
  • GIGABYTE B550 AORUS PRO V2 (AMD Ryzen 5000/ B550/ ATX/ PCIe4.0/ DDR4/ Realtek ALC1220-VB/ Front & Rear USB Type-C/ RGB Fusion 2.0/ Dual M.2 Thermal Guard/ Gaming Motherboard)
  • ASUS TUF Gaming B550M-PLUS (WiFi 6) AMD AM4 (3rd Gen Ryzen™) microATX Gaming Motherboard (PCIe 4.0, 2.5Gb LAN, BIOS Flashback, HDMI 2.1, USB 3.2 Gen 2, Addressable Gen 2 RGB Header and Aura Sync)
  • ASUS TUF B450M-Plus Gaming AMD Ryzen 2 AM4 DDR4 HDMI DVI-D M.2 mATX Motherboard

Choosing a motherboard that supports both the Ryzen 5 5600X and the RTX 3060 Ti would be the best option.

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You can expect higher performance and dependability if you use the top components.

A disadvantage to receiving what you pay for is that the cost rises. Why not go for the best you can afford, even if it’s a little more expensive? There’s no harm in doing so.

The optimal motherboard for Ryzen 5 5600X and RTX 3060 Ti would include a high-quality power architecture in order to safeguard all other components from interference. The greatest gaming motherboard necessitates excellent cooling.

If your graphics card isn’t supported by your motherboard, then you should hunt for a motherboard with PCI-Express slots or slot choices that are compatible with your CPU and GPU.

ALSO SEE: Best GPU for Ryzen 5 5600X, 7 5800x, & 9 5900x

Table of Contents

Best Motherboard for Ryzen 5 5600X and RTX 3060 Ti

  • ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Dark Hero AMD AM4 X570S Zen 3 Ryzen 5000 & 3rd Gen Ryzen ATX Gaming Motherboard (PCIe 4.0, 14+2 Ti Power Stages, PCH Heatsink, Wi-Fi 6, 2.5 Gbps LAN, USB 3.2 Gen 2 Type-C

Greater specifications or better value can be found in motherboards. I’ll be honest and admit that after more than 20 years of making computers as a hobbyist, I’m now a big fan of Asus.

For the price difference, I’ve experienced fewer troubles or unanticipated issues with Asus.

Others may have higher paper specs or offer greater value, but I only purchase Asus products since they are guaranteed to perform up to my specifications.

Complementary motherboards from Gigabyte are available with greater numbers of m.2 slots or higher maximum memory speeds. Although Gigabyte products have been plagued by problems in the past, they are a brand that I am familiar with. If I’m purchasing, I’m willing to take a risk in order to get a better price or value.

MSI If you’re looking for something that’s a little bit more affordable, Asus is generally my go-to because it’s equally as good. One MSI laptop and one MSI motherboard had a problem that was handled, although not very well.

Regardless of the brand, this board is just what I needed for my X570.

Looks good, built-in IO shield, removable case pinout connectors, removable case pinouts, and all the other features you’d expect from a high-end board (bios flashback, cooling, etc etc.)

This BIOS is nearly ideal for my taste. The profile/favorites pinning feature is definitely an improvement.

The drawbacks of this message board are largely subjective. Quality assurance is a premium that you pay for. However, you’re taking a chance on quality and reliability by going with the more expensive Gigabyte.

As of Gen 4, 2tb is becoming more and more frequent; nonetheless, there are boards with more m.2 slots.

Ram is Daisy chained on the board, which I’d say is a good idea.

Daisy chain is preferable with 2 dual rank sticks, which fit well with 32GB total, because of my OCD. Although 99.9% of people will be OK with 16GB, 32GB offers marginally superior performance, and at this pricing range, why not? For example, are there 32GB single rank sticks available if you need to maximize your ram?

On a T Topology board, you could theoretically run four 32GB dual-rank sticks, or four 16GB single-rank sticks, but it’s still a bit of a gamble to buy both single and dual-rank 16GB sticks from the same brand.

To me, the price premium is worth it because the board performs just as it should. Gigabyte has a better cost to performance/features ratio if you’re a gambler.

  • MSI MPG B550I Gaming Edge WiFi Gaming Motherboard (AMD AM4, DDR4, PCIe 4.0, SATA 6Gb/s, M.2, USB 3.2 Gen 2, AX Wi-Fi 6, HDMI, Mini-ITX)

This is a fantastic ITX board. VRM and PCI-e gen 4 capabilities were the main reasons I upgraded from the MSI B450i gaming plus. The B450 is still an excellent board, but the feature updates made this buy with it. Game performance is nearly comparable.

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PCI-e gen 4, two M.2 slots, wifi 6 with gigabyte wifi, 2.5 gig LAN, usb c internal header, enhanced VRM design, three fan header (b450 has only two), addressable rgb header (b450 has two 12v headers).

Make sure to purchase a CPU cooler that utilizes the stock back plate when building with this board. Soloing with Alphacool eisbaer is no problem.

Connecting a Corsair Commander was a challenge due to the usb 2.0 internal header. Under the GPU, the cable had to be smashed against the audio caps.

Because of this, when I opened icue to alter the fan curves, my speakers gave off a lot of feedback, popping and cracking. Buying an extension cable and wrapping it around the entire enclosure proved to be the most practical approach.

Overall, this motherboard has a really clean appearance. It’s mostly tidy, but reaching one of the fan headers will require crawling over the top of the RAM. Unlike the Asus x570 and b550, the m.2 heatsink rests flat against the motherboard.

MSI positioned the clear CMOS at an inconvenient location, but given the motherboard’s size, it’s logical.

It needed a home. To access it, MSI should have supplied some sort of custom connector, but creating one isn’t difficult, and I highly recommend it. A little button for Clear CMOS should have been included in MSI’s I/O Shield.

MSI b450’s heatsink over the VRM is significantly larger than the preceding MSI b450’s heatsink.

With the b450, you get an extra fan header and a USBC port.

If you’re planning on using USB 2.0, you’ll have to route all of your connections through a tiny gap between your graphics card and a pcie slot, which isn’t ideal.

  • ASUS ROG Strix X570-E Gaming ATX Motherboard- PCIe 4.0, Aura Sync RGB Lighting, 2.5 Gbps and Intel Gigabit LAN, WIFI 6 (802.11Ax), Dual M.2 Heatsinks

To replace my old FX9590 and Asus M5A99FX Pro, I combined this with a R7 2700x.

Everything appeared to be made to extremely strict specifications, making it appear to be extremely sturdy.

I was able to successfully boot into the BIOS after putting everything together (using Gskill TridentZ Neo 32GB 3200 16D).

As with past Asus motherboards, the BIOS included a ton of options yet was simple to operate.

The second time I tried to boot up, I was unable to see any of my nvme drives, which I had installed in three different locations: two on-board and one PCI-E. A heatsink on one of my nvme m2 drives prevented it from fitting in the on-board slot, so I just transferred it to the PCI-E slot. I had to make some BIOS adjustments to get all of my disks recognized. In addition, I successfully updated my BIOS to the current version.

Once the OS was up and running, I set about trying to put the different programs and tools I’d downloaded on the computer. It’s at this point that the board loses one star!

My prior board’s Asus software hasn’t improved since I bought this one. Aside from half of the lighting effects, there were no working features in Armoury Crate. Use caution while using this program.

CPU resources are consistently devoured by Aura Lighting. Aura’s lighting service consumes an average of 8 percent of the CPU, while Corsair’s lighting service uses only 0.8 percent. This is shown in Task Manager.

Notably, Easy AntiCheat (Apex Legends) detects Armoury Crate and Aura as cheat applications or software mods and prevents you from playing while they are active.

Still a long way to go, but AI Suite 3 is a significant improvement over the previous version.

There is fast and reliable WiFi built in. I intend to get a new router shortly in order to get the most out of my current one.

Assuming that Memtest had come up clean, I reset the RAM to 3200 in the BIOS and reran the test. In total, I made approximately a dozen mistakes. In the BIOS, I went back and changed the RAM voltage from 1.35 to 1.38, and it appears to have fixed the issues thus far.

Only a few days in, but I’m satisfied with the results so far (aside from the poor software utilities). A future update will be made after further use.

As a result of resolving the Easy AntiCheat issue, using this program is now lot more pleasant.

I’m having a lot of issues with the lighting control in the new BIOS. All of Armory Crate’s features were rendered inoperable, including AURA’s ability to open.

Uninstalling and re-installing the app repeatedly hasn’t worked for me. As a side note, my computer won’t wake up from sleep mode; I have to reboot the system. However, I’m not sure if that was the case before I changed the BIOS to 1405.

Rather than reinstalling the Intel WiFi and LAN drivers from the ASUS website, I downloaded the Intel Driver and Support Assistant and installed the drivers through it, and I haven’t had any issues since..

Remove Armory Crate and AURA from your computer. Then go into your registry and manually erase any references to LightingControl there may have been. A fresh copy of Aurora was then installed and appears to be operating at this time.

After much deliberation, I decided to uninstall Aura and reinstall Armory Crate.

The Armory Crate is much more stable now, and Aura was crashing on me. RAID0 installations were created using the raidXpert software. Nvme slots on the motherboard and 2 WD Black are used for the first time in this experiment.

Nvme to Pcie adapters and two WD Black nvme with heatsinks were used in the second. No problems have been encountered with either of them thus far. The storeMI drive is an AMD application that combines an SSD with an external mechanical disk and some of your RAM to form a single “disk” with the speed of an SSD and the storage capacity of an external mechanical drive.

The length of the WiFi antenna cable, on the other hand, is a bit on the short side.

While adjusting the height of my desk, I almost took out my WiFi card. When the entire computer stopped down, I thought I was doomed, but a little wiggling fixed everything.

Best Motherboard for Ryzen 5 5600X

  • MSI Meg X570 Unify Motherboard (AMD AM4, DDR4, PCIe 4.0, SATA 6GB/s, M.2, USB 3.2 Gen 2, Ax Wi-Fi 6, Bluetooth 5, ATX)

Very pleased with my board, it is just what I wanted. The pre-installed I/O shield worked perfectly with my setup (Fractal R5). Everything went according to plan, and there were no major issues.

With a Ryzen 7 3800X, I was able to get my RAM to run at 3600 MHz. The only LEDs on this board are the power button and the CPU temperature LED, and I think that’s brilliant. Other than that, there’s nothing else.

All of the capacitors are Nippon Nippon caps from Japan. Exceptional products. I still have my MSI board from 2010 with the same capacitors, and it has been used and mistreated heavily.

Additionally, all of the board’s slots and other components, such as the headers, are rock solid. There doesn’t appear to be any flex in the PCB.

Unless you wish to use the lower slots or remove the GPU to free up space, my only other piece of advise is to install your M.2 drive as soon as possible. Doing so after installing the GPU is cumbersome at best.

It hasn’t changed much in the 10 years I’ve been using MSI BIOS. While it’s an improvement over the previous version, it’s still nothing spectacular. Asus or another manufacturer’s BIOS and configuration software may be more appealing to some users.

Overall, this is the nicest X570 board I’ve seen if you don’t care about RGBs or other gimmicks and simply want a clean, straightforward look that’s packed with useful features for modern systems. The MSI Ace, which is priced similarly to this board and features VRMs on par with similar ones in terms of quality, has RGBs if you desire.

  • ASUS ROG X570 Crosshair VIII Hero (Wi-Fi) ATX Motherboard with PCIe 4.0, on-Board WiFi 6 (802.11Ax), 2.5 Gbps LAN, USB 3.2, SATA, M.2, Node and Aura Sync RGB Lighting

I’ve owned a few Asus computers over the years, and they’ve all been excellent.

There are a lot of features on this one as well.

If you get a PCI-4.0 SSD, you’ll have amazing nvme 5GB per second transfer speeds.

While it’s a fine virtual machine arrangement, even two 3900X CPUs would be overwhelmed by it (if you could actually install 2) Lol.

However, the Ryzen 3000 series CPUs don’t have a lot of overclocking potential.

There isn’t a lot of rgb lighting on the board, but what there is is adequate.

Removing one of the heatsinks is made more difficult because it is connected to the onboard fan in some way.

Convenient use of the debug led

The IO panel has a large number of USB ports, as well as the ability to flash the BIOS.

If you need to re-flash your bios for any reason, bios flashback is a lifesaver.

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It doesn’t even require a processor or memory!

Memory aid is excellent.

Components of the highest caliber and excellent sound.

  • ASUS ROG Strix X570-I Gaming, X570 Mini-ITX Gaming Motherboard, AMD Ryzen 3000 with PCIe 4.0, WiFi 6 (802.11ax), Intel Gigabit Ethernet, SATA 6Gb/s

Despite the fact that this motherboard is widely regarded as one of the best on the market, I can confirm that I had no issues with it.

Everything functions as it should right out of the box. It was never used, therefore everything works as it should, including the fans, the BIOS, the RAM slots, the M.2 screw, the well-built quality, the ARGB functionality, and so on. THERE’S NO ISSUE WHATSOEVER.

The BIOS was the only thing holding me back from making a purchase. I was concerned that I would need a previous AMD series processor to get it up and running because of the lack of an onboard BIOS FlashBack USB port.

When it booted up with the installed BIOS, I was relieved. Even though it wasn’t the most recent version, it worked with my AMD 9 5950x. No issues were encountered during the BIOS update.

This MB has exceeded my expectations in every way. Fast, cool, everything works perfectly with the 570 chipset that supports PCIe 4.

All previous issues with this board have been fixed. Now is the time to buy it with confidence. On a board of this stature, the FlashBack feature would be welcome.

  • ASUS Prime X570-Pro AM4 Zen 3 Ryzen 5000 & 3rd Gen Ryzen ATX Motherboard with PCIe Gen4, Dual M.2 HDMI, SATA 6GB/s USB 3.2 Gen 2 ATX Motherboard

This is one of the cheapest ASUS motherboards for the AMD X-570 chipset, the Ryzen 9 processor. Aside from the TUF-Gaming boards that were out of stock, this was not my first pick.

In no way did this leave me dissatisfied. Out of the box, it was perfect! Because neither the motherboard box nor the static-package had a seal, I was a little apprehensive. I examined the board very closely and took pictures to make sure there was no damage or evidence of previous use.

In the previous 20 years, I’ve built a few dozen systems. This is a fantastic board. Most of the unfavorable reviews, I believe, are the result of a mistake made by the reviewer or an unusual occurrence.

ASUS motherboards have never given me any trouble. As of 2010, my M4A89GTD PRO/USB3 is still going strong…if a tad slower than before.

One reviewer mentioned that the Memory DDR4 mounting brackets are “cheap” because they only have one moveable locking end, but I can’t see how that would be a problem.

The locking pin is secure when the DDR4 DIMM is pushed straight down as instructed in the handbook. In all honesty, this was the simplest DIMM installation I’ve ever performed.

I don’t handle my cases delicately and move systems about frequently, so I doubt the DIMMs will be available. That complaint is, in my opinion, unjustified or overstated.

Only a few pieces of mounting hardware are included in the package. The only fasteners supplied were the screws and spacers for the M.2 port. I’m not sure if ASUS is reducing costs, or if this is a lower quality ASUS board (although no ASUS board is garbage, they just have cheaper options).

Since the Rosewill case I purchased had mounting hardware, and I already had screws and other hardware from past builds, this wasn’t a problem for me. As a result, you should be aware that if your PC case does not include screws for attaching the motherboard, your build may be delayed.

ASUS Q-Connectors are included in the box, which simplifies attaching all of your case’s front I/O connections (Power switch, Power LED Reset Switch Drive Access Light Front Audio etc…) much easier.

Only two SATA cables are included in the package.

There is no ASUS Sticker anywhere to be found.

No stickers. That’s my greatest issue, as corny it may seem. To have an ASUS sticker included in the price, you’ll have to buy ROG or Tuf-Gaming.

Their marketing team should fork over a few cents to encourage brand loyalty and pride (I’ll stick with ASUS until they’re shoddy products, which I’ve never had the misfortune of experiencing; as long as their products remain high quality, they’ve got a customer for life, regardless of whether or not they have a sticker).

The UEFI BIOS was a breeze to work with. Before I installed Windows 10, I was able to upgrade the BIOS Firmware directly from the BIOS over the internet. It was a pleasure to work with you. Version 1005 of the BIOS, dated 8/12/2019, was installed without ever having to exit the BIOS or boot into an operating system.

The only issue I ran into throughout installation was a faulty LG BH12LS35 SATA Blu-Ray burner, which I believe was the root cause of my problems during setup. It’s been behaving strangely lately, refusing to read or burn DVDs on occasion.

It was identified by the UEFI BIOS, however there appears to be a mechanical issue. I used the Windows 10 Media Creation Tools to create installation media for my thumb drive, and it worked flawlessly.

One of the few devices available to early adopters that can try out the new PCIe 4.0 standard is the Sabrent Rocket PCIe 4.0 M.2 SSD, and I was worried that it would have issues with my new motherboard and Windows 10 installation.

ASUS should have done a better job of explaining the motherboard handbook in this case. There is some doubt as to whether or not I followed the directions correctly.

The portions of the motherboard handbook that deal with configuring PCIe 4.0 SSDs are found on pages 1-13, 1-21, 3-14, and 3-15.

The SATA connectors can be configured in either AHCI or RAID mode, according to 1-13. Because the M.2 sockets can be used in either PCIe or SATA mode, I was a little perplexed as to whether BIOS settings for the SATA drive would have any effect on PCIe drives, as there didn’t appear to be a PCIe settings page.

My Blu-Ray burner wouldn’t work until I switched back to AHCI mode. This did not appear to be an option on my earlier boards, which enabled some ports to run RAID and others AHCI.

RAID controller software may be advanced enough to allow AHCI ports to be used on some of the RAID ports. The truth is, I have no idea.

A RAID configuration with two Sabrent Rocket PCIe 4.0 SSDs in both M.2 sockets just doesn’t make sense to me. Some users have complained in the forums that this drive’s incredible speed cannot be used because there is nothing you can copy from it. Lol, it’s fast to boot up!

In NVMe RAID mode The RAID option here isn’t clear to me, but I think it’s the best option. It’s merely an option that can be turned on or off. Although I just have one hard disk, I’m sure that I activated it.

There’s a mention of PCIEX16 2 bandwidth on page 3-15 (the closest physical PCIEX16 1 slot is recommended for a single GPU, whereas PCIEX16 2 should be used for a second SLI GPU, as seen on pages 1-7)

PCIEX16 2 Bandwidth has two options: [X8 Mode] or [PCIe RAID Mode].

“The Hyper M.2 x16 card and other add-on M.2 devices all run in the x4 mode, which enables you to establish a PCIe RAID array,” reads the explanatory note for PCIe RAID Mode.

Below that, there’s a note that reads: “When installing the Hyper M.2 X 16 card or another M.2 adapter card, make sure PCIe RAID Mode is selected. When using PCIe RAID mode, installing additional devices may cause your computer to fail to boot.”

PCIe RAID mode was selected here and elsewhere because I am using another M.2adaptor card. She’s up and running, but I’m not sure what I was expected to do.

Since I’m not utilizing the XMP profile for JDEC values, I haven’t yet done anything with my Memory to maximize its performance. Passmark scores the CPU and Sabrent Rocket in the 99th percentile on the default settings.

Just like the new Sabrent Rocket, this board appears to “play nicely” with AMD’s Ryzen 9 3900X processor (not listed on the QVL). My patience was running thin as I awaited Samsung’s PCIe 4.0 offering. So far, I’m extremely happy with this set-up.

  • ASUS AM4 TUF Gaming X570-Plus (Wi-Fi) AM4 Zen 3 Ryzen 5000 & 3rd Gen Ryzen ATX Motherboard with PCIe 4.0, Dual M.2, 12+2 with Dr. MOS Power Stage

This board has a lot of good things, like a lot of SATA ports, a good Wi-Fi antenna, and a good VRM.

The BIOS is easy to update, and the layout is intuitive. Yes, it’s a good board if you don’t plan to overclock it.

Even though they are somewhat lower than they should be, there is nothing you can do to raise them. This is why this board consistently performs poorly in benchmarks.

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Overclocking settings such as bclk adjustment and bclk sit at 99.8, spread spectrum and digi+ memory control have been removed from the ASUS BIOS. The BIOS is not up to snuff here. Do not purchase this board if you intend to overclock your CPU and RAM. There are other options available for you to choose from.

  • Gigabyte X570 AORUS Elite (AMD Ryzen 3000/X570/ATX/PCIe4.0/DDR4/USB3.1/Realtek ALC1200/Front USB Type-C/RGB Fusion 2.0/M.2 Thermal Guard/Gaming Motherboard)

Compared to other X570 boards, this is one of the better value options for handling the 3900X. Simply put, it is a simple board with no wifi and a superbly crafted 12+2 phase VRM that should be able to handle the 3950X when it is released. The Gigabyte X570 Elite, in my opinion, is the best X570 value if you don’t require any more features on your motherboard.

AMD AM4, DDR4, PCIe 4.0, SATA 6Gb/s, M.2, USB 3.2 Gen 2, AC Wi-Fi 5, HDMI, ATX motherboard

MSI, on the other hand, is a slacker. When it comes to BIOS upgrades and their “Dragon Center” software, Gigabyte and ASUS are hot rubbish. This RGB control connection with other goods is yuck, as is their “Mystic Light” version.

Even with standard cooling, my 3700x runs fairly nicely on this board. I’m not overclocking, and the bios settings are all default except for XMP and fan curve adjustments.

I’ve read a lot of negative things about the VRM, but I haven’t experienced any issues with it. Idle 46-49C, under load 70-75; never becomes super load trying to cool itself down, even in benchmarks.).

As a rule of thumb, I’m running all of my CPUs at 4600Mhz, with most cores idling at 3600Mhz.

There is no abnormality in voltage, albeit it is erratic. (between 0.98 and 1.5 volts, with a typical range of 1.15 to 1.40 volts)

Note: My on-board sound is now clicking and popping excessively after the most recent Windows 10 update. (I’m not sure who’s to blame, but it needs to be fixed as soon as possible.) On the other hand, before to this, the on-board sound was pretty pleasant and pristine.

Once the bios and chipset drivers are worked out a little more, I think this board will be a lot better. Seeing as how these processors and chipsets are so new, I expect some minor annoyances into the fourth quarter of this year (2019), but nothing major.

  • GIGABYTE B550 AORUS PRO V2 (AMD Ryzen 5000/ B550/ ATX/ PCIe4.0/ DDR4/ Realtek ALC1220-VB/ Front & Rear USB Type-C/ RGB Fusion 2.0/ Dual M.2 Thermal Guard/ Gaming Motherboard)

One of the greatest B550s on the market for a reasonable price. An excellent BIOS, with many options for overclocking and tweaking settings, can be found in Gigabyte motherboards. PCIe slots include a reinforced one for your 1×16 GPU, as well as two m.2 slots and plenty of USB 3.0 and PCIe ports.

Just a sliver of color. B550 motherboards, which are among the best in terms of performance and value, are what I’d recommend.

  • ASUS TUF Gaming B550M-PLUS (WiFi 6) AMD AM4 (3rd Gen Ryzen™) microATX Gaming Motherboard (PCIe 4.0, 2.5Gb LAN, BIOS Flashback, HDMI 2.1, USB 3.2 Gen 2, Addressable Gen 2 RGB Header and Aura Sync)

Because of the decent BIOS, it has a lot of potentials and was a breeze to set up. When the built-in software won’t allow you to update or retrograde the BIOS, the Flashback function is an excellent alternative.

There are numerous USB ports on the rear panel; however, my case does not have an internal Type C port, so that’s not a problem. A high-core-count CPU can be easily overclocked with this VRM’s good and sturdy VRM.

However, the lack of a temperature display on the CPU VRM may make the experience uncomfortable.

That’s a big omission because the DIGI+ VRM controller has it, but Asus elected not to disclose it for monitoring.

Lack of sensor reading of voltage applied to DDR4 DIMMs is another irritating omission; as a result, there is no way to check that they are receiving the right voltage.

No-cost-saving decisions on the part of the company result in dissatisfied customers and an easy comparison with the competition when it comes to future purchases.

  • ASUS TUF B450M-Plus Gaming AMD Ryzen 2 AM4 DDR4 HDMI DVI-D M.2 mATX Motherboard.

For the past 15 years, I’ve only purchased ASUS motherboards. First time I’ve had a problem with one. This system is powered by a Ryzen 7 2700 CPU and QVL RAM.

Black screen and video card error beeps were heard on the first board after the online BIOS upgrading failed. It appears that the crash-free BIOS was unable to resume in the absence of the CPU’s onboard graphics.

The SECOND board remained on the BIOS configuration screen for roughly 30 seconds before going dark. However, there is no post (no beeps at all). Asus PRIME B450M-A/CSM is what I used in its substitute. This board performed beautifully, as has every other ASUS board I’ve owned in the past as well.

There was a minor hiccup with the PRIME board’s BIOS, which arrived with the most recent version already pre-installed. Because of this, I didn’t have any problems with it. End-user product testing is something I have no desire to participate in.

With a 95W TDP, the Ryzen 5 3600X is slightly more powerful than the new Ryzen 5 5600X. When you consider that the Ryzen 5 5600X can boost faster than the Ryzen 5 3600X, at 4.6GHz against 4.4GHz, you can see that this is a significant power saving.

What motherboard is best for a Ryzen 5 5600X?

The ASUS ROG Strix X570-E motherboard, which uses AMD’s X570 chipset, is our top pick for the best Ryzen 5 5600X motherboard. It’s not the most inexpensive, but it’s capable of running the most powerful Ryzen 9 processors with ease.

Is B550 or X570 better for Ryzen 5 5600X?

To buy the best Ryzen 5 5600x motherboard at a reasonable price, the B550 is your best bet. Nonetheless, if you’re looking for a high-end motherboard with features like speedier USB ports and a premium VRM design, you should go for the X570.

Is B550 good for Ryzen 5 5600X?

To buy the best Ryzen 5 5600x motherboard at a reasonable price, the B550 is your best bet. The X570 motherboard, on the other hand, has some premium features like speedier USB ports and a premium VRM design, so if money isn’t an issue, it’s the better choice.

Is the Ryzen 5 5600X good for gaming?

There is a great blend of Intel-beating performance for gaming and application tasks in the AMD Ryzen 5 5600X.

Is ASUS TUF gaming B550 plus good for Ryzen 5 5600X?

Powered by Zen 3 Architecture, the AMD Ryzen 5 5600X processor is the latest in AMD’s Ryzen line of processors. It’s built for gamers that want lightning-fast response times. Supports up to 3200MHz dual-channel DDR4 memory.

Is Ryzen 5 4650G compatible with B550?

Yes, the 4650G is supported.

Will B550 support Ryzen 2000?

The Ryzen 3000 is the only CPU supported by this chipset, which is Zen2 based. As a result, despite the fact that it is technically capable, this chipset does not support Ryzen 1000 and Ryzen 2000 CPUs.

Things To Consider While Shopping

It’s always a good idea to keep a few simple shopping hints in mind when looking for a motherboard for your custom build or upgrade.

E-ATX, ATX, mATX, and mini-ITX are just a few of the numerous form factors that motherboards come in. The mATX form factor allows for more interoperability and upgradeability, as well as a smaller footprint. The E-ATX form factor, on the other hand, is strongly recommended if you intend to overclock your CPU and GPU at the same time. ATX, on the other hand, is the most reliable and can be used in all kinds of computers.

Choosing the correct socket for your CPU is critical;

if you have a Ryzen 5 5600x processor, for example, your motherboard should have an AM4 socket. You will not be able to put your CPU on the motherboard if your motherboard does not have a socket that is compatible with your CPU.

RAM:

Because a computer’s memory is so crucial, it should be one of your top considerations when shopping for a motherboard. For example, DDR4 DIMMs, which are the most common currently, are supported by most motherboards. In terms of RAM, I’d recommend either two sticks or four sticks as a good starting point.

Slots for PCIe cards:

Check your motherboard to see if it has any PCIe slots. When building a PC, you need to make sure there are enough slots to accommodate the finest graphics card you intend to utilize.

The motherboard should have at least two USB 3.2 ports for connecting your other devices, but I recommend adding four or more for the greatest performance. It would be a good idea to use Killer LAN, HDMI 2.0b, and DisplayPort 1.4 for improved FPS performance in games.

Author: Howard S. Baldwin

My name is Howard S. Baldwin. I am a work-at-home dad to three lovely girls, Jane + Hannah + Beauty. I have been blogging for the last 3 years. I worked for other Home and Lifetsyle blogs, did hundreds of product reviews and buyers’ guides. Prior to that, I was a staff accountant at a big accounting firm. Needless to say, researching and numbers are my passion. My goal is to be an informative source for any topic that relates to DIY life and homemaking.

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